How to diagnose anterograde amnesia

How to diagnose anterograde amnesia

How do we tell when someone is experiencing anterograde amnesia?

Anterograde amnesia, refers to the ability to lay down new memories. Persons with anterograde amnesia may not perceive any symptoms, or they may be profoundly confused and disoriented. Kelly Zalocusky describes the symptoms of anterograde amnesia, and explains the differences between this particular type of memory deficit, and another common form, dementia. 

Read More

Ask a Neuroscientist: Auditory Hallucinations

Ask a Neuroscientist: Auditory Hallucinations

Why can we hear music that isn’t really there? Dr. Luke Parkitny discusses how this question gnaws at some fairly complex and incompletely understood neuroscience phenomena. He explains how: "At the core of auditory hallucinations lies a breakdown in how signals from the outside world are translated into experience. ... In a sense, the world of musical hallucinations is one that is dominated by memories and predictions that are untempered by reality."

Read More

Remembering neuroscientist Allison Doupe

This past Friday, the neuroscience community suffered a great loss with the passing of Allison Doupe, a professor of neuroscience at UCSF. Professor Doupe was our very first guest on the Neurotalk podcast, which I wanted to repost here as a small way of remembering and appreciating her life and contributions to science. You can also find a short write-up about Professor Doupe here: In Memoriam: Allison Doupe