For those with pure word deafness, actions always speak louder than words

For those with pure word deafness, actions always speak louder than words

The phone rings — you hear it. The caller ID displays — you read it. You pick up the phone — you say hello. But no matter how hard you listen, you can’t understand a single word that’s said either by you or the caller. 

No, you haven't just crossed over into the Twilight Zone; you have a rare syndrome called pure word deafness (PWD). Individuals with PWD cannot understand any speech, even if they can identify other sounds and read written words with no difficulty whatsoever

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Remembering neuroscientist Allison Doupe

This past Friday, the neuroscience community suffered a great loss with the passing of Allison Doupe, a professor of neuroscience at UCSF. Professor Doupe was our very first guest on the Neurotalk podcast, which I wanted to repost here as a small way of remembering and appreciating her life and contributions to science. You can also find a short write-up about Professor Doupe here: In Memoriam: Allison Doupe

 

 

Ask a Neuroscientist: Spoken versus Written Language

Ask a Neuroscientist: Spoken versus Written Language

n this edition of Ask a Neuroscientist, I crowdsource the answer to a question about the differences between how the brain processes spoken versus written language.  

The question comes from Minski, who wrote:

"Does writing down what I think and saying what I think activate different parts of the brain and neuropathways?  I feel I have an easier time writing than I do speaking, so I wonder.  

Thank you for your time and knowledge!"

 

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